The Measure of Civilization: How Social Development Decides the Fate of Nations
(eBook)

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Princeton University Press, 2013.
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eBook
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Language
English
ISBN
9781400844760

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APA Citation, 7th Edition (style guide)

Ian Morris., & Ian Morris|AUTHOR. (2013). The Measure of Civilization: How Social Development Decides the Fate of Nations . Princeton University Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Author Date Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Ian Morris and Ian Morris|AUTHOR. 2013. The Measure of Civilization: How Social Development Decides the Fate of Nations. Princeton University Press.

Chicago / Turabian - Humanities (Notes and Bibliography) Citation, 17th Edition (style guide)

Ian Morris and Ian Morris|AUTHOR. The Measure of Civilization: How Social Development Decides the Fate of Nations Princeton University Press, 2013.

MLA Citation, 9th Edition (style guide)

Ian Morris, and Ian Morris|AUTHOR. The Measure of Civilization: How Social Development Decides the Fate of Nations Princeton University Press, 2013.

Note! Citations contain only title, author, edition, publisher, and year published. Citations should be used as a guideline and should be double checked for accuracy. Citation formats are based on standards as of August 2021.

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Grouped Work ID55b7b2f4-caf2-98f4-4a2c-b71498e48167-eng
Full titlemeasure of civilization how social development decides the fate of nations
Authormorris ian
Grouping Categorybook
Last Update2024-05-15 02:00:45AM
Last Indexed2024-06-15 03:12:17AM

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    [synopsis] => Ian Morris is the Jean and Rebecca Willard Professor of Classics and professor of history at Stanford University. His most recent book is the award-winning Why the West Rules--for Now: The Patterns of History, and What They Reveal about the Future (Farrar, Straus and Giroux) which has been translated into eleven languages. 
	A groundbreaking look at Western and Eastern social development from the end of the ice age to today

In the past thirty years, there have been fierce debates over how civilizations develop and why the West became so powerful. The Measure of Civilization presents a brand-new way of investigating these questions and provides new tools for assessing the long-term growth of societies. Using a groundbreaking numerical index of social development that compares societies in different times and places, award-winning author Ian Morris sets forth a sweeping examination of Eastern and Western development across 15,000 years since the end of the last ice age. He offers surprising conclusions about when and why the West came to dominate the world and fresh perspectives for thinking about the twenty-first century.

Adapting the United Nations' approach for measuring human development, Morris's index breaks social development into four traits-energy capture per capita, organization, information technology, and war-making capacity-and he uses archaeological, historical, and current government data to quantify patterns. Morris reveals that for 90 percent of the time since the last ice age, the world's most advanced region has been at the western end of Eurasia, but contrary to what many historians once believed, there were roughly 1,200 years-from about 550 to 1750 CE-when an East Asian region was more advanced. Only in the late eighteenth century CE, when northwest Europeans tapped into the energy trapped in fossil fuels, did the West leap ahead.

Resolving some of the biggest debates in global history, The Measure of Civilization puts forth innovative tools for determining past, present, and future economic and social trends. "Stanford University classicist and historian Morris follows up Why the West Rules--for Now with a sophisticated volume designed to add quantitative muscle to his earlier arguments. A big-history theorist working in a vein similar to Niall Ferguson or Jared Diamond, Morris measures societies' historical 'abilities to get things done in the world.' With an impressive data array, he calibrates energy resources, social organization, war-making capacity, and information technology over time to compare the East and West. In the 21st century, he foresees a shift in global power and wealth from West to East, much as it shifted from East to West in the 19th. . . . The ingenuity and style of his arguments will make economists and historians stand up and take notice." "Buttressed with numerous graphs and engagingly written, this work provides much food for thought." "Using a groundbreaking numerical index of social development that compares societies in different times and places, award-winning author Ian Morris gives a sweeping examination of Eastern and Western development across 15,000 years since the end of the last ice age. He offers surprising conclusions about when and why the West came to dominate the world and fresh perspectives for thinking about the twenty-first century. . . . Resolving some of the biggest debates in global history, The Measure of Civilization puts forth innovative tools for determining past, present, and future economic and social trends." "Quantification is an invaluable tool for understanding the patterns of history. This book is to be applauded for thinking about how to measure the social competence of earlier societies."---Gregory Clark, American Historical Review "Praise for Ian Morris: "Morris is the world's most talented ancient historian, a man as much at home with state-of-the-art archaeology as with the classics as they used to be studied.""---Niall Ferguson
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